Harvard Catalyst Profiles

Contact, publication, and social network information about Harvard faculty and fellows.

Stephanie A. Smith-Warner, Ph.D.

Co-Author

This page shows the publications co-authored by Stephanie Smith-Warner and Julie Buring.
Connection Strength

3.135
  1. Body size and weight change over adulthood and risk of breast cancer by menopausal and hormone receptor status: a pooled analysis of 20 prospective cohort studies. Eur J Epidemiol. 2021 Jan; 36(1):37-55.
    View in: PubMed
    Score: 0.235
  2. Circulating Vitamin D and Colorectal Cancer Risk: An International Pooling Project of 17 Cohorts. J Natl Cancer Inst. 2019 02 01; 111(2):158-169.
    View in: PubMed
    Score: 0.209
  3. Coffee, tea, and caffeine intake and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis mortality in a pooled analysis of eight prospective cohort studies. Eur J Neurol. 2019 03; 26(3):468-475.
    View in: PubMed
    Score: 0.205
  4. Prediagnostic body size and risk of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis death in 10 studies. Amyotroph Lateral Scler Frontotemporal Degener. 2018 08; 19(5-6):396-406.
    View in: PubMed
    Score: 0.197
  5. Alcohol consumption and breast cancer risk by estrogen receptor status: in a pooled analysis of 20 studies. Int J Epidemiol. 2016 06; 45(3):916-28.
    View in: PubMed
    Score: 0.164
  6. Fruit and vegetable intake and risk of breast cancer by hormone receptor status. J Natl Cancer Inst. 2013 Feb 06; 105(3):219-36.
    View in: PubMed
    Score: 0.137
  7. Carotenoid intakes and risk of breast cancer defined by estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor status: a pooled analysis of 18 prospective cohort studies. Am J Clin Nutr. 2012 Mar; 95(3):713-25.
    View in: PubMed
    Score: 0.128
  8. Intakes of vitamins A, C, and E and use of multiple vitamin supplements and risk of colon cancer: a pooled analysis of prospective cohort studies. Cancer Causes Control. 2010 Nov; 21(11):1745-57.
    View in: PubMed
    Score: 0.116
  9. Risk of colon cancer and coffee, tea, and sugar-sweetened soft drink intake: pooled analysis of prospective cohort studies. J Natl Cancer Inst. 2010 Jun 02; 102(11):771-83.
    View in: PubMed
    Score: 0.114
  10. Intakes of fruit, vegetables, and carotenoids and renal cell cancer risk: a pooled analysis of 13 prospective studies. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2009 Jun; 18(6):1730-9.
    View in: PubMed
    Score: 0.107
  11. Fat, protein, and meat consumption and renal cell cancer risk: a pooled analysis of 13 prospective studies. J Natl Cancer Inst. 2008 Dec 03; 100(23):1695-706.
    View in: PubMed
    Score: 0.103
  12. Height, body mass index, and ovarian cancer: a pooled analysis of 12 cohort studies. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2008 Apr; 17(4):902-12.
    View in: PubMed
    Score: 0.098
  13. Intakes of coffee, tea, milk, soda and juice and renal cell cancer in a pooled analysis of 13 prospective studies. Int J Cancer. 2007 Nov 15; 121(10):2246-53.
    View in: PubMed
    Score: 0.096
  14. Fruits, vegetables, and colon cancer risk in a pooled analysis of 14 cohort studies. J Natl Cancer Inst. 2007 Oct 03; 99(19):1471-83.
    View in: PubMed
    Score: 0.095
  15. Alcohol intake and renal cell cancer in a pooled analysis of 12 prospective studies. J Natl Cancer Inst. 2007 May 16; 99(10):801-10.
    View in: PubMed
    Score: 0.093
  16. Dietary carotenoids and risk of colorectal cancer in a pooled analysis of 11 cohort studies. Am J Epidemiol. 2007 Feb 01; 165(3):246-55.
    View in: PubMed
    Score: 0.090
  17. Intake of the major carotenoids and the risk of epithelial ovarian cancer in a pooled analysis of 10 cohort studies. Int J Cancer. 2006 Nov 01; 119(9):2148-54.
    View in: PubMed
    Score: 0.089
  18. Methods for pooling results of epidemiologic studies: the Pooling Project of Prospective Studies of Diet and Cancer. Am J Epidemiol. 2006 Jun 01; 163(11):1053-64.
    View in: PubMed
    Score: 0.086
  19. A pooled analysis of 12 cohort studies of dietary fat, cholesterol and egg intake and ovarian cancer. Cancer Causes Control. 2006 Apr; 17(3):273-85.
    View in: PubMed
    Score: 0.086
  20. Alcohol intake and ovarian cancer risk: a pooled analysis of 10 cohort studies. Br J Cancer. 2006 Mar 13; 94(5):757-62.
    View in: PubMed
    Score: 0.085
  21. Dairy products and ovarian cancer: a pooled analysis of 12 cohort studies. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2006 Feb; 15(2):364-72.
    View in: PubMed
    Score: 0.085
  22. Dietary fiber intake and risk of colorectal cancer: a pooled analysis of prospective cohort studies. JAMA. 2005 Dec 14; 294(22):2849-57.
    View in: PubMed
    Score: 0.084
  23. Fruits and vegetables and ovarian cancer risk in a pooled analysis of 12 cohort studies. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2005 Sep; 14(9):2160-7.
    View in: PubMed
    Score: 0.082
  24. Abdominal and gluteofemoral size and risk of liver cancer: The liver cancer pooling project. Int J Cancer. 2020 08 01; 147(3):675-685.
    View in: PubMed
    Score: 0.055
  25. Is high vitamin B12 status a cause of lung cancer? Int J Cancer. 2019 09 15; 145(6):1499-1503.
    View in: PubMed
    Score: 0.052
  26. Circulating cotinine concentrations and lung cancer risk in the Lung Cancer Cohort Consortium (LC3). Int J Epidemiol. 2018 12 01; 47(6):1760-1771.
    View in: PubMed
    Score: 0.052
  27. Association between Vitamin D Genetic Risk Score and Cancer Risk in a Large Cohort of U.S. Women. Nutrients. 2018 Jan 09; 10(1).
    View in: PubMed
    Score: 0.048
  28. Impaired functional vitamin B6 status is associated with increased risk of lung cancer. Int J Cancer. 2018 06 15; 142(12):2425-2434.
    View in: PubMed
    Score: 0.048
  29. Circulating Folate, Vitamin B6, and Methionine in Relation to Lung Cancer Risk in the Lung Cancer Cohort Consortium (LC3). J Natl Cancer Inst. 2018 01 01; 110(1).
    View in: PubMed
    Score: 0.048
  30. Circulating concentrations of biomarkers and metabolites related to vitamin status, one-carbon and the kynurenine pathways in US, Nordic, Asian, and Australian populations. Am J Clin Nutr. 2017 06; 105(6):1314-1326.
    View in: PubMed
    Score: 0.046
Connection Strength
The connection strength for co-authors is the sum of the scores for each of their shared publications.

Publication scores are based on many factors, including how long ago they were written and whether the person is a first or senior author.
Funded by the NIH National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences through its Clinical and Translational Science Awards Program, grant number UL1TR002541.