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SEX DIFFERENCES IN DAILY STRESS AND COPING


Biography

Overview
This proposal seeks support for continued analyses of data collected during an earlier period of funding. These data involve daily diaries off stress, coping, social support, and mood collected in two studies. In the first study, respondents in 70 couples kept daily diaries for up to nine weeks, producing information for more than 6000 person-days. In the second study, respondents in 183 couples kept diaries for up to six weeks, producing information for more than 12,000 person-days. Respondents in both diary studies were drawn from a sample of 1000 couples who had previously participated in a personal interview as part of a large-scale general population survey of married couples in the Detroit Metropolitan Area. the interview data concerning life stress , social support, roles, self-concept, health, and psychological functioning, are available to augment the diary data.

The primary research aim is to understand the determinants of sex differences in psychological distress among married men and women, with a particular focus on daily stress and coping processes. Recent research indicates that daily stress has greater implications for psychological distress and for sex differences in distress and coping on a day-to-day basis. This project takes advantage of recent developments in theory, methodology, and data analysis strategies to investigate sex differences in distress as a function of daily stress and coping.
R01MH041135
KESSLER, RONALD C

Time
1986-05-01
1991-12-31
Funded by the NIH National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences through its Clinical and Translational Science Awards Program, grant number UL1TR002541.