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David Whitcomb Gow Jr., PH.D.

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Research
The research activities and funding listed below are automatically derived from NIH ExPORTER and other sources, which might result in incorrect or missing items. Faculty can login to make corrections and additions.
  1. R01DC015455 (GOW, DAVID W) Apr 1, 2017 - Mar 31, 2022
    NIH/NIDCD
    Identifying the neural structures and dynamics that regulate phonological structure
    Role: Principal Investigator
  2. R01DC003108 (GOW, DAVID W) Feb 1, 1998 - Aug 31, 2014
    NIH/NIDCD
    Neural Dynamics of Spoken Word Recognition
    Role: Principal Investigator
  3. R29DC003108 (GOW, DAVID W) Feb 1, 1998 - Jan 31, 2005
    NIH/NIDCD
    LEXICAL SEGMENTATION AND ACCESS IN APHASIA
    Role: Principal Investigator

Bibliographic
Publications listed below are automatically derived from MEDLINE/PubMed and other sources, which might result in incorrect or missing publications. Faculty can login to make corrections and additions.
List All   |   Timeline
  1. Gow DW, Ahlfors SP. Tracking reorganization of large-scale effective connectivity in aphasia following right hemisphere stroke. Brain Lang. 2017 07; 170:12-17. PMID: 28364641.
    View in: PubMed
  2. Gow DW, Olson BB. Using effective connectivity analyses to understand processing architecture: Response to commentaries by Samuel, Spivey and McQueen, Eisner and Norris. Lang Cogn Neurosci. 2016; 31(7):869-875. PMID: 28090547.
    View in: PubMed
  3. Saint-Aubin J, Klein RM, Babineau M, Christie J, Gow DW. The Missing-Phoneme Effect in Aural Prose Comprehension. Psychol Sci. 2016 07; 27(7):1019-26. PMID: 27154551.
    View in: PubMed
  4. Gow DW, Olson BB. Lexical mediation of phonotactic frequency effects on spoken word recognition: A Granger causality analysis of MRI-constrained MEG/EEG data. J Mem Lang. 2015 Jul 01; 82:41-55. PMID: 25883413.
    View in: PubMed
  5. Gow DW, Olson BB. Sentential influences on acoustic-phonetic processing: A Granger causality analysis of multimodal imaging data. Lang Cogn Neurosci. 2016; 31(7):841-855. PMID: 27595118.
    View in: PubMed
  6. Jones M, Odunsi S, du Plessis D, Vincent A, Bishop M, Head MW, Ironside JW, Gow D. Gerstmann-StraĆ¼ssler-Scheinker disease: novel PRNP mutation and VGKC-complex antibodies. Neurology. 2014 Jun 10; 82(23):2107-11. PMID: 24814844; PMCID: PMC4118501.
  7. Gow DW, Nied AC. Rules from words: a dynamic neural basis for a lawful linguistic process. PLoS One. 2014; 9(1):e86212. PMID: 24465965; PMCID: PMC3897659.
  8. Gow DW, Caplan DN. New levels of language processing complexity and organization revealed by granger causation. Front Psychol. 2012; 3:506. PMID: 23293611; PMCID: PMC3536267.
  9. Gow DW. The cortical organization of lexical knowledge: a dual lexicon model of spoken language processing. Brain Lang. 2012 Jun; 121(3):273-88. PMID: 22498237; PMCID: PMC3348354.
  10. Caplan D, Gow D. Effects of tasks on BOLD signal responses to sentence contrasts: Review and commentary. Brain Lang. 2012 Feb; 120(2):174-86. PMID: 20932562; PMCID: PMC3020235.
  11. Gow DW, Keller CJ, Eskandar E, Meng N, Cash SS. Parallel versus serial processing dependencies in the perisylvian speech network: a Granger analysis of intracranial EEG data. Brain Lang. 2009 Jul; 110(1):43-8. PMID: 19356793; PMCID: PMC2693301.
  12. Stewart JD, Tennant S, Powell H, Pyle A, Blakely EL, He L, Hudson G, Roberts M, du Plessis D, Gow D, Mewasingh LD, Hanna MG, Omer S, Morris AA, Roxburgh R, Livingston JH, McFarland R, Turnbull DM, Chinnery PF, Taylor RW. Novel POLG1 mutations associated with neuromuscular and liver phenotypes in adults and children. J Med Genet. 2009 Mar; 46(3):209-14. PMID: 19251978.
    View in: PubMed
  13. Gow DW, Segawa JA. Articulatory mediation of speech perception: a causal analysis of multi-modal imaging data. Cognition. 2009 Feb; 110(2):222-36. PMID: 19110238.
    View in: PubMed
  14. Gow DW, Segawa JA, Ahlfors SP, Lin FH. Lexical influences on speech perception: a Granger causality analysis of MEG and EEG source estimates. Neuroimage. 2008 Nov 15; 43(3):614-23. PMID: 18703146; PMCID: PMC2585985.
  15. Harris ML, Julyan P, Kulkarni B, Gow D, Hobson A, Hastings D, Zweit J, Hamdy S. Mapping metabolic brain activation during human volitional swallowing: a positron emission tomography study using [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose. J Cereb Blood Flow Metab. 2005 Apr; 25(4):520-6. PMID: 15689960.
    View in: PubMed
  16. Gow D, Hobson AR, Furlong P, Hamdy S. Characterising the central mechanisms of sensory modulation in human swallowing motor cortex. Clin Neurophysiol. 2004 Oct; 115(10):2382-90. PMID: 15351381.
    View in: PubMed
  17. David W. Gow, Jr. Aaron Im. A cross-linguistic examination of assimilation context effects. Journal of Memory and Language,. 2004; 51:279-296.
  18. Gow DW. Feature parsing: feature cue mapping in spoken word recognition. Percept Psychophys. 2003 May; 65(4):575-90. PMID: 12812280.
    View in: PubMed
  19. David W. Gow Jr. How representations help define computational problems. Journal of Phonetics. 2003; 31:487-493.
  20. David W. Gow Jr. Does phonological assimilation create lexical ambiguity?. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance. 2002; 28:163-179.
  21. David W. Gow Jr. Cheryl Zoll. The role of feature parsing in speech processing and phonology. MIT Working Papers in Linguistics. 2002; 42:55-68.
  22. David W. Gow Jr. Assimilation and anticipation in continuous spoken word recognition. Journal of Memory and Language. 2001; 45:133-159.
  23. David W. Gow Jr. One phonemic representation should suffice: Commentary on Norris, McQueen and Cutler (2000). Merging information in speech recognition: Feedback is never necessary. Behavioral and Brain Sciences. 2000; 23:331.
  24. David W. Gow Jr. Philip C. Rodkin. Can current methods of pathonormal inference tell us anything about modularity?. Behavioral and Brain Sciences. 1999; 22:571-572.
  25. Gow DW, Caplan D. An examination of impaired acoustic-phonetic processing in aphasia. Brain Lang. 1996 Feb; 52(2):386-407. PMID: 8811970.
    View in: PubMed
  26. Gow DW, Gordon PC. Lexical and prelexical influences on word segmentation: evidence from priming. J Exp Psychol Hum Percept Perform. 1995 Apr; 21(2):344-59. PMID: 7714476.
    View in: PubMed
  27. Caplan D, Gow D, Makris N. Analysis of lesions by MRI in stroke patients with acoustic-phonetic processing deficits. Neurology. 1995 Feb; 45(2):293-8. PMID: 7854528.
    View in: PubMed
  28. Gow DW, Gordon PC. Coming to terms with stress: effects of stress location in sentence processing. J Psycholinguist Res. 1993 Nov; 22(6):545-78. PMID: 8295163.
    View in: PubMed
  29. David W. Gow Jr. Lexical and prelexical factors in the perception of connected speech. 1993.
  30. David W. Gow Jr. Force dynamic representation of causatives. 1987.
  31. Maryanne Wolf David W. Gow Jr. A longitudinal investigation of gender issues in language and reading development. First Language. 1986; 6:81-110.
  32. David W. Gow Jr. An assessment of linguistic competence in dolphins and the great apes. 1984.
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