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Shuji Ogino, M.D., Ph.D.

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Biography
2004
AMP Executive Officer's Award
2011
USCAP Ramzi Cotran Young Investigator Award
2012
AMP Meritorious Service Award
2014
Most Influential Scientific Minds
2014 - pres
ASCI Elected Member
2014 - pres
Member, FASEB Excellence in Science Award Committee
2015
Most Influential Scientific Minds
2015 - 2022
NCI Outstanding Investigator Award (OIA)
2016
Highly Cited Researcher
2017
Highly Cited Researcher
2018
ASIP Outstanding Investigator Award
2018
Highly Cited Researcher
2018
Runner-up for the Mentor-of-the-Year Award
2019 - 2021
Invited Nominator for Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 2019, 2020, 2021
2019 - 2022
Highly Cited Researcher 2019, 2020, 2021

Overview
Dr. Ogino is Chief, Program in MPE Molecular Pathological Epidemiology of Department of Pathology, Brigham and Women's Hospital. He has been expanding the integrative interdisciplinary science of molecular pathological epidemiology (MPE). He is an associate member of Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard. He has been serving as the Chair or Co-Chair for The International MPE Meeting Series since 2013 and its 6th meeting (10-Year Anniversary Summit) was successfully held in 2023 (www.mpemeeting.org).Dr. Ogino's research has broad themes: the integration of molecular pathology, omics (genomics), microbiology, immunology, epidemiology, bioinformatics, and population health sciences. Dr. Ogino's interest has been to develop new scientific disciplines, and develop new data analysis framework and methodologies. A particular recent focus of the Ogino Lab is early-onset cancer (EOC) including colorectal cancer (EOCRC), which has been shown increased incidence in persons under age 50 years. Dr. Ogino works on the application of integrated scientific approaches to early-onset cancer (EOC) research. The Ogino Lab has used gastrointestinal cancers as model human diseases (including colorectal carcinoma, colorectal polyp, colorectal adenoma, pancreatic adenocarcinoma, neuroendocrine tumor, pancreatic endocrine tumor, carcinoid tumor). The Ogino Lab has also shown a general rising EOC trend in many organ sites and in many countries (Ugai T et al. Nat Rev Clin Oncol 2022). In the 2010s, Dr. Ogino started to make new research frameworks for analyses of epidemiological exposure variables in relation to the incidence of tumor subtypes classified by tumor microenvironmental features such as microbiota, immune cell infiltrates, and their functional status. The Ogino Lab has made several discoveries, most notably specific links between dietary/lifestyle modifiable factors and pathogenic bacteria or immune cell infiltrates in tumor tissue, which shed light on pathogenic mechanisms of exposure-disease associations through tissue microenvironmental changes, i.e., so-called "etiologic field effect" (conceptualized by Lochhead P et al. in Mod Pathol 2015).Dr. Ogino has created a number of new research frameworks, concepts, paradigms, and models, including molecular pathological epidemiology (MPE) (Ogino and Stampfer. J Natl Cancer Inst 2010; Ogino et al. Annu Rev Pathol 2019), the GWAS-MPE approach (Ogino et al. Gut 2011), the colorectal continuum model (Yamauchi et al. Gut 2012), the unique disease principle (Ogino et al. Mod Pathol 2013), the etiologic field effect model (Lochhead et al. Mod Pathol 2015), the causal inference-MPE integration (Nishihara et al. Eur J Epidemiol 2015; Liu et al. Eur J Epidemiol 2018), lifecourse-MPE approach (Nishi et al. Am J Prev Med 2015), social MPE (Nishi et al. Expert Rev Mol Diagn 2016), immunology-MPE integration (Ogino et al. Gut 2018), pharmaco-MPE (Ogino et al. npj Precis Oncol 2017), microbiology-MPE integration (Inamura et al. Gut 2022), and nutritional MPE. In particular, Dr. Ogino is currently integrating analyses of exposome, germline genetics, tissue microbiota (microbiome), tumor immunity, cancer incidence, and clinical outcomes in large human populations. The lifecourse-MPE approach has substantial potential in research on early-onset cancers including early-onset colorectal cancer (Akimoto et al. Nat Rev Clin Oncol 2021; Ugai et al. Nat Rev Clin Oncol 2022).Dr. Ogino is Chief, Program in MPE Molecular Pathological Epidemiology of Department of Pathology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, developing the integrative interdisciplinary science of "Molecular Pathological Epidemiology (MPE)". He is an associate member of Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard. He has been serving as Chairperson for The International MPE Meeting Series since 2013. The 4th International Molecular Pathological Epidemiology (MPE) Meeting is planned to be held on May 31 to June 1, 2018 in Boston, MA, USA.

Dr. Ogino's research has a broad theme: Integration of Molecular Pathology, Omics (Genomics), ?Epidemiology, Bioinformatics, and Population Health Science. Dr. Ogino's focus is to develop new scientific disciplines, and develop new data analysis framework and methodologies. The Ogino Lab uses gastrointestinal cancers as model human diseases (including colorectal carcinoma, colorectal polyp, colorectal adenoma, pancreatic adenocarcinoma, neuroendocrine tumor, pancreatic endocrine tumor, carcinoid tumour). We have been analyzing germline and somatic genomics, transcriptomics, epigenomics, and immunomics in human tumors. Using massively parallel sequencing (next generation sequencing) technologies, the Ogino Lab has sequenced whole exome of over 1,000 colorectal carcinomas with high dimensional annotations, and calculated tumor neoantigen load. In addition, the Ogino Lab has obtained data on transcriptome of over 250 colorectal carcinomas (by RNA sequencing).

Dr. Ogino has created a number of new research frameworks, concepts, paradigms, and models, including molecular pathological epidemiology (MPE), the GWAS-MPE approach, the colorectal continuum model, the etiologic field effect model, the causal inference-MPE integration, lifecourse-MPE approach, social MPE, immuno-MPE (immunology-MPE integration), pharmaco-MPE, microbiology-MPE integration, MPE-comparative effectiveness research integration, and nutritional MPE.Dr. Ogino is Chief, Program in MPE Molecular Pathological Epidemiology of Department of Pathology, Brigham and Women's Hospital. He has been expanding the integrative interdisciplinary science of molecular pathological epidemiology (MPE). He is an associate member of Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard. He has been serving as the Chair or Co-Chair for The International MPE Meeting Series since 2013 and its 6th meeting (10-Year Anniversary Summit) was successfully held in 2023 (www.mpemeeting.org).

Dr. Ogino's research has broad themes: the integration of molecular pathology, omics (genomics), microbiology, immunology, epidemiology, bioinformatics, and population health sciences. Dr. Ogino's interest has been to develop new scientific disciplines, and develop new data analysis framework and methodologies. A particular recent focus of the Ogino Lab is early-onset cancer (EOC) including colorectal cancer (EOCRC), which has been shown increased incidence in persons under age 50 years. Dr. Ogino works on the application of integrated scientific approaches to early-onset cancer (EOC) research. The Ogino Lab has used gastrointestinal cancers as model human diseases (including colorectal carcinoma, colorectal polyp, colorectal adenoma, pancreatic adenocarcinoma, neuroendocrine tumor, pancreatic endocrine tumor, carcinoid tumor). The Ogino Lab has also shown a general rising EOC trend in many organ sites and in many countries (Ugai T et al. Nat Rev Clin Oncol 2022). In the 2010s, Dr. Ogino started to make new research frameworks for analyses of epidemiological exposure variables in relation to the incidence of tumor subtypes classified by tumor microenvironmental features such as microbiota, immune cell infiltrates, and their functional status. The Ogino Lab has made several discoveries, most notably specific links between dietary/lifestyle modifiable factors and pathogenic bacteria or immune cell infiltrates in tumor tissue, which shed light on pathogenic mechanisms of exposure-disease associations through tissue microenvironmental changes, i.e., so-called "etiologic field effect" (conceptualized by Lochhead P et al. in Mod Pathol 2015).

Dr. Ogino has created a number of new research frameworks, concepts, paradigms, and models, including molecular pathological epidemiology (MPE) (Ogino and Stampfer. J Natl Cancer Inst 2010; Ogino et al. Annu Rev Pathol 2019), the GWAS-MPE approach (Ogino et al. Gut 2011), the colorectal continuum model (Yamauchi et al. Gut 2012), the unique disease principle (Ogino et al. Mod Pathol 2013), the etiologic field effect model (Lochhead et al. Mod Pathol 2015), the causal inference-MPE integration (Nishihara et al. Eur J Epidemiol 2015; Liu et al. Eur J Epidemiol 2018), lifecourse-MPE approach (Nishi et al. Am J Prev Med 2015), social MPE (Nishi et al. Expert Rev Mol Diagn 2016), immunology-MPE integration (Ogino et al. Gut 2018), pharmaco-MPE (Ogino et al. npj Precis Oncol 2017), microbiology-MPE integration (Inamura et al. Gut 2022), and nutritional MPE. In particular, Dr. Ogino is currently integrating analyses of exposome, germline genetics, tissue microbiota (microbiome), tumor immunity, cancer incidence, and clinical outcomes in large human populations. The lifecourse-MPE approach has substantial potential in research on early-onset cancers including early-onset colorectal cancer (Akimoto et al. Nat Rev Clin Oncol 2021; Ugai et al. Nat Rev Clin Oncol 2022).

Research
The research activities and funding listed below are automatically derived from NIH ExPORTER and other sources, which might result in incorrect or missing items. Faculty can login to make corrections and additions.
  1. R50CA274122 (UGAI, TOMOTAKA) Aug 30, 2023 - Jul 31, 2028
    NIH/NCI
    Integration of Immunology and Microbiology into Molecular Pathological Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer
    Role: Research Unit Director
  2. DoD CA220816 (YU, KUN-HSING) Jul 1, 2023 - Jun 30, 2027
    Department of Defense
    Optimizing Individualized Colorectal Cancer Treatment and Prognostic Prediction via Causal Machine Learning
    Role: Co-Investigator
  3. R21CA252962 (ZHANG, XUEHONG) Aug 10, 2021 - Jul 31, 2024
    NIH
    Multidisciplinary Study of Folate Intake and Colorectal Cancer
    Role: Co-Investigator
  4. R01CA248857 (OGINO, SHUJI ;PETERS, ULRIKE ;PHIPPS, AMANDA IRENE) May 1, 2020 - Apr 30, 2026
    NIH
    Interdisciplinary Epidemiologic Consortium to Investigate T-cell Response in Colorectal Cancer
    Role: Co-Principal Investigator
  5. Grand Challenge (MEYERSON, MATTHEW) Jan 1, 2019 - Apr 30, 2024
    Cancer Research UK
    Opportunity to Investigate the Microbiome's Impact on Science and Treatment in Colorectal Cancer (OPTIMISTICC)
    Role Description: No cost extension approved through December 2025.
    Role: Co-Leader of Work Package 2

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Funded by the NIH National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences through its Clinical and Translational Science Awards Program, grant number UL1TR002541.