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Leigh Taylor Graham, Ph.D.

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Biography
Massachusetts Institute of TechnologyPhD2010Urban Studies and Planning
NYU Stern School of BusinessMBA2001Management and Organizations, Entrepreneurship
Brandeis UniversityBA1997Sociology and Journalism

Overview
Leigh Graham, PhD, MBA, is a Senior Advisor and Core Faculty at Ariadne Labs, a joint innovation center for healthcare delivery at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and The Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston. She is also a Research Scientist at Chan and a Design Critic at Harvard's Graduate School of Design.

Dr. Graham is a qualitative social scientist and expert on urban policy and social equity. At Ariadne, she focuses on building community health equity across a range of clinical disciplines and in cities around the U.S. As the Scientific Lead for the Delivery Decisions Initiative's Maternal Wellbeing City Dashboard, she developed its conceptual framework of livable communities for birthing people, which integrates urban planning and public health praxis to improve community-based wellbeing for mothers and their families through a focus on measurable social determinants of health that impact maternal mortality and morbidity. She also developed the dashboard's testing strategy for geographic and demographic diversity, and advised on its application for policy advocacy. More recently, Leigh co-led research and human-centered design for the New York City Health Department on ameliorating loneliness and fostering a culture of belonging, and is now leading qualitative research on incorporating race dialogues in serious illness care with Dr. Justin Sanders, a palliative care physician at McGill.

Dr. Graham's scholarship and writing has appeared in peer-reviewed policy journals as well as local and national media. Prior to joining Ariadne Labs, Leigh was a professor at The CUNY Graduate Center and John Jay College of Criminal Justice in New York City, where she also served as the Faculty Director for the Tow Policy Advocacy Fellowship, mentoring graduate students in careers in criminal justice policy change. She has been a consultant to local governments, philanthropic foundations, and community organizations to generate more equitable development outcomes in cities and regions impacted by climate change and wealth inequality.

Bibliographic
Publications listed below are automatically derived from MEDLINE/PubMed and other sources, which might result in incorrect or missing publications. Faculty can login to make corrections and additions.
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PMC Citations indicate the number of times the publication was cited by articles in PubMed Central, and the Altmetric score represents citations in news articles and social media. (Note that publications are often cited in additional ways that are not shown here.) Fields are based on how the National Library of Medicine (NLM) classifies the publication's journal and might not represent the specific topic of the publication. Translation tags are based on the publication type and the MeSH terms NLM assigns to the publication. Some publications (especially newer ones and publications not in PubMed) might not yet be assigned Field or Translation tags.) Click a Field or Translation tag to filter the publications.
  1. Molina RL, DiMeo A, Graham L, Galvin G, Shah N, Langer A. Racial/Ethnic Inequities in Pregnancy-Related Social Support: Design Workshops With Community-Based Organizations in Greater Boston. J Public Health Manag Pract. 2022 Jan-Feb 01; 28(Suppl 1):S66-S69. PMID: 34797263.
    Citations:    Fields:    Translation:HumansPHPublic Health
  2. Sanders JJ, Gray TF, Sihlongonyane B, Durieux BN, Graham L. A Framework for Anti-Racist Publication in Palliative Care: Structures, Processes, and Outcomes. J Pain Symptom Manage. 2022 Mar; 63(3):e337-e343. PMID: 34662725.
    Citations:    Fields:    
  3. Schneider, MC., Graham, L., Hornstein, A., LaRiviere, K.J., Muldoon, K., Shepherd, S., and Wagner, R. Caregiving, Disability, and Gender in Academia in the time of COVID-19. ADVANCE Journal. 2021; 2(3). View Publication.
  4. The Maternal Wellbeing City Dashboard. 2021. View Publication.
  5. Graham, L. Public housing participation in Superstorm Sandy recovery: living in a differentiated state in Rockaway, Queens. Urban Affairs Review. 2020; 56(1):289-324. View Publication.
  6. Nguyen, M.T., Evans-Cowley, J., Graham, L., Tighe, R., Solitaire, L., and Van Zandt, S. When a joke represents so much more: the end of PLANET and the rise of planners 2040. Planning Theory & Practice. 2017; 18(1):156-162. View Publication.
  7. Graham, L., Debucquoy, W. & Anguelovski, I. The influence of urban development dynamics on community resilience practice in New York City after Superstorm Sandy: Experiences from the Lower East Side and the Rockaways. Global Environmental Change. 2016; 40:112-124. View Publication.
  8. Graham, L. The Routledge Handbook of Poverty in the United States, De Haymes, M.V., Haymes, S.N. and Miller, R.J. eds. Legitimizing and resisting neoliberalism in U.S. community development: The influential role of community development intermediaries. 2015; 512-521. View Publication.
  9. Graham, L. Razing Lafitte: Defending public housing from a hostile state. Journal of the American Planning Association. 2012; 78(4):466-480. View Publication.
  10. Graham, L. Advancing the human right to housing in post-Katrina New Orleans: Discursive opportunity structures in housing and community development. Housing Policy Debate. 2012; 22(1):5-27. View Publication.
  11. Graham, Leigh Taylor. Planning Tremé : the community development field in a post-Katrina world. 2010. View Publication.
  12. Graham, L. Permanently failing organizations? Small business recovery after September 11, 2001. Economic Development Quarterly. 2007; 21(4):299-314. View Publication.
  13. Murray, F. and L. Graham. Buying science and selling science: Gender differences in the market for commercial science. Industrial and Corporate Change. 2007; 16(4):657-689. View Publication.
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Funded by the NIH National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences through its Clinical and Translational Science Awards Program, grant number UL1TR002541.