Harvard Catalyst Profiles

Contact, publication, and social network information about Harvard faculty and fellows.

Matcheri S Keshavan, M.D.

Co-Author

This page shows the publications co-authored by Matcheri Keshavan and John Torous.
Connection Strength

19.109
  1. Towards precision clinical trials and personalized prevention in CHR with smartphone digital phenotyping and personal sensing tools. Schizophr Res. 2021 01; 227:61-62.
    View in: PubMed
    Score: 0.894
  2. COVID-19, mobile health and serious mental illness. Schizophr Res. 2020 04; 218:36-37.
    View in: PubMed
    Score: 0.893
  3. Schizophr Res. 2019 04; 206:1.
    View in: PubMed
    Score: 0.830
  4. Issue highlights. Schizophr Res. 2018 Dec; 202:1-2.
    View in: PubMed
    Score: 0.811
  5. Mental Health Mobile Phone App Usage, Concerns, and Benefits Among Psychiatric Outpatients: Comparative Survey Study. JMIR Ment Health. 2018 Nov 16; 5(4):e11715.
    View in: PubMed
    Score: 0.809
  6. Highlights in this issue. Schizophr Res. 2018 Nov; 201:1-2.
    View in: PubMed
    Score: 0.803
  7. Clinical highlights in this Issue. Schizophr Res. 2018 Jul; 197:1.
    View in: PubMed
    Score: 0.787
  8. Clinical Highlights in this issue. Schizophr Res. 2018 05; 195:1-2.
    View in: PubMed
    Score: 0.779
  9. A crossroad for validating digital tools in schizophrenia and mental health. NPJ Schizophr. 2018 Apr 06; 4(1):6.
    View in: PubMed
    Score: 0.775
  10. A new window into psychosis: The rise digital phenotyping, smartphone assessment, and mobile monitoring. Schizophr Res. 2018 07; 197:67-68.
    View in: PubMed
    Score: 0.763
  11. Characterizing Smartphone Engagement for Schizophrenia: Results of a Naturalist Mobile Health Study. Clin Schizophr Relat Psychoses. 2017 Aug 04.
    View in: PubMed
    Score: 0.740
  12. New dimensions and new tools to realize the potential of RDoC: digital phenotyping via smartphones and connected devices. Transl Psychiatry. 2017 03 07; 7(3):e1053.
    View in: PubMed
    Score: 0.719
  13. Corrigendum: Barriers, Benefits, and Beliefs of Brain Training Smartphone Apps: An Internet Survey of Younger US Consumers. Front Hum Neurosci. 2016; 10:253.
    View in: PubMed
    Score: 0.682
  14. The role of social media in schizophrenia: evaluating risks, benefits, and potential. Curr Opin Psychiatry. 2016 May; 29(3):190-5.
    View in: PubMed
    Score: 0.678
  15. Barriers, Benefits, and Beliefs of Brain Training Smartphone Apps: An Internet Survey of Younger US Consumers. Front Hum Neurosci. 2016; 10:180.
    View in: PubMed
    Score: 0.677
  16. Patient Smartphone Ownership and Interest in Mobile Apps to Monitor Symptoms of Mental Health Conditions: A Survey in Four Geographically Distinct Psychiatric Clinics. JMIR Ment Health. 2014 Jul-Dec; 1(1):e5.
    View in: PubMed
    Score: 0.618
  17. Smartphone ownership and interest in mobile applications to monitor symptoms of mental health conditions. JMIR Mhealth Uhealth. 2014 Jan 21; 2(1):e2.
    View in: PubMed
    Score: 0.579
  18. The growing field of digital psychiatry: current evidence and the future of apps, social media, chatbots, and virtual reality. World Psychiatry. 2021 Oct; 20(3):318-335.
    View in: PubMed
    Score: 0.247
  19. Cross cultural and global uses of a digital mental health app: results of focus groups with clinicians, patients and family members in India and the United States. Glob Ment Health (Camb). 2021; 8:e30.
    View in: PubMed
    Score: 0.245
  20. Smartphone ownership and use of mental health applications by psychiatric inpatients. Psychiatry Res. 2021 05; 299:113806.
    View in: PubMed
    Score: 0.236
  21. Smartphone Health Assessment for Relapse Prevention (SHARP): a digital solution toward global mental health - CORRIGENDUM. BJPsych Open. 2021 Feb 05; 7(2):e48.
    View in: PubMed
    Score: 0.236
  22. Anomaly detection to predict relapse risk in schizophrenia. Transl Psychiatry. 2021 01 11; 11(1):28.
    View in: PubMed
    Score: 0.235
  23. Smartphone Health Assessment for Relapse Prevention (SHARP): a digital solution toward global mental health. BJPsych Open. 2021 01 07; 7(1):e29.
    View in: PubMed
    Score: 0.235
  24. Deriving symptom networks from digital phenotyping data in serious mental illness. BJPsych Open. 2020 Nov 03; 6(6):e135.
    View in: PubMed
    Score: 0.232
  25. Making mental health more accessible in light of COVID-19: Scalable digital health with digital navigators in low and middle-income countries. Asian J Psychiatr. 2020 Dec; 54:102433.
    View in: PubMed
    Score: 0.232
  26. Smartphone relapse prediction in serious mental illness: a pathway towards personalized preventive care. World Psychiatry. 2020 Oct; 19(3):308-309.
    View in: PubMed
    Score: 0.230
  27. Impact of dynamic greenspace exposure on symptomatology in individuals with schizophrenia. PLoS One. 2020; 15(9):e0238498.
    View in: PubMed
    Score: 0.229
  28. Systematic Review of Digital Phenotyping and Machine Learning in Psychosis Spectrum Illnesses. Harv Rev Psychiatry. 2020 Sep/Oct; 28(5):296-304.
    View in: PubMed
    Score: 0.229
  29. The digital clinic: Implementing technology and augmenting care for mental health. Gen Hosp Psychiatry. 2020 Sep - Oct; 66:59-66.
    View in: PubMed
    Score: 0.226
  30. Towards clinically actionable digital phenotyping targets in schizophrenia. NPJ Schizophr. 2020 May 05; 6(1):13.
    View in: PubMed
    Score: 0.224
  31. Digital Opportunities for Outcomes in Recovery Services (DOORS): A Pragmatic Hands-On Group Approach Toward Increasing Digital Health and Smartphone Competencies, Autonomy, Relatedness, and Alliance for Those With Serious Mental Illness. J Psychiatr Pract. 2020 03; 26(2):80-88.
    View in: PubMed
    Score: 0.221
  32. Smartphone-Based Tracking of Sleep in Depression, Anxiety, and Psychotic Disorders. Curr Psychiatry Rep. 2019 06 04; 21(7):49.
    View in: PubMed
    Score: 0.210
  33. Towards remote digital phenotyping of cognition in schizophrenia. Schizophr Res. 2019 06; 208:36-38.
    View in: PubMed
    Score: 0.209
  34. Assessing the potential of longitudinal smartphone based cognitive assessment in schizophrenia: A naturalistic pilot study. Schizophr Res Cogn. 2019 Sep; 17:100144.
    View in: PubMed
    Score: 0.208
  35. A new hope for early psychosis care: the evolving landscape of digital care tools. Br J Psychiatry. 2019 05; 214(5):269-272.
    View in: PubMed
    Score: 0.206
  36. Digital mental health apps and the therapeutic alliance: initial review. BJPsych Open. 2019 Jan; 5(1):e15.
    View in: PubMed
    Score: 0.204
  37. The Emerging Imperative for a Consensus Approach Toward the Rating and Clinical Recommendation of Mental Health Apps. J Nerv Ment Dis. 2018 08; 206(8):662-666.
    View in: PubMed
    Score: 0.198
  38. Characterizing the clinical relevance of digital phenotyping data quality with applications to a cohort with schizophrenia. NPJ Digit Med. 2018; 1:15.
    View in: PubMed
    Score: 0.194
  39. Smartphones for Smarter Care? Self-Management in Schizophrenia. Am J Psychiatry. 2017 08 01; 174(8):725-728.
    View in: PubMed
    Score: 0.185
  40. Response to "Tandon et al. Psychiatry is a clinical neuroscience, but how do we move the field". Asian J Psychiatr. 2016 Aug; 22:15-6.
    View in: PubMed
    Score: 0.169
  41. Psychiatry Residents' Use of Educational Websites: A Pilot Survey Study. Acad Psychiatry. 2015 Dec; 39(6):630-3.
    View in: PubMed
    Score: 0.160
  42. A proposed solution to integrating cognitive-affective neuroscience and neuropsychiatry in psychiatry residency training: The time is now. Asian J Psychiatr. 2015 Oct; 17:116-21.
    View in: PubMed
    Score: 0.159
  43. #Schizophrenia: Use and misuse on Twitter. Schizophr Res. 2015 Jul; 165(2-3):111-5.
    View in: PubMed
    Score: 0.158
  44. Utilizing a Personal Smartphone Custom App to Assess the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) Depressive Symptoms in Patients With Major Depressive Disorder. JMIR Ment Health. 2015 Jan-Mar; 2(1):e8.
    View in: PubMed
    Score: 0.157
  45. Recent advances in understanding schizophrenia. F1000Prime Rep. 2014; 6:57.
    View in: PubMed
    Score: 0.150
  46. Promise and perils of digital psychiatry. Asian J Psychiatr. 2014 Aug; 10:120-2.
    View in: PubMed
    Score: 0.149
  47. Social decline in the psychosis prodrome: Predictor potential and heterogeneity of outcome. Schizophr Res. 2021 01; 227:44-51.
    View in: PubMed
    Score: 0.058
  48. Beyond smartphones and sensors: choosing appropriate statistical methods for the analysis of longitudinal data. J Am Med Inform Assoc. 2018 12 01; 25(12):1669-1674.
    View in: PubMed
    Score: 0.051
  49. Relapse prediction in schizophrenia through digital phenotyping: a pilot study. Neuropsychopharmacology. 2018 07; 43(8):1660-1666.
    View in: PubMed
    Score: 0.048
  50. A comparison of passive and active estimates of sleep in a cohort with schizophrenia. NPJ Schizophr. 2017 Oct 16; 3(1):37.
    View in: PubMed
    Score: 0.047
  51. A comparison of passive and active estimates of sleep in a cohort with schizophrenia. NPJ Schizophr. 2017; 3:37.
    View in: PubMed
    Score: 0.047
  52. The WPA-Lancet Psychiatry Commission on the Future of Psychiatry. Lancet Psychiatry. 2017 10; 4(10):775-818.
    View in: PubMed
    Score: 0.047
Connection Strength
The connection strength for co-authors is the sum of the scores for each of their shared publications.

Publication scores are based on many factors, including how long ago they were written and whether the person is a first or senior author.
Funded by the NIH National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences through its Clinical and Translational Science Awards Program, grant number UL1TR002541.