Harvard Catalyst Profiles

Contact, publication, and social network information about Harvard faculty and fellows.

DYADIC RESPONSES TO STRESS: A STUDY OF MARRIED COUPLES


Biography

Overview
This proposal seeks support to collect a second wave of data from a sample of married couples originally interviewed in the Fall and Summer of 1985. It also requests support to administer a clinical diagnostic interview to two groups of respondents: all respondents who meet screening criteria for lifetime diagnoses of Major Depressive Disorder or Generalized Anxiety Disorder, and a random subsample of respondents who do not meet screening criteria. This will allow calculation of both the sensitivity and specificity of the screening instrument.

The substantive concern of the research is dyadic adjustment to stress -- the ways in which couples confront stressful experiences and distribute the burdens for stress management between husbands and wives. This focus on dyadic adjustment provides a valuable new perspective to research on sex differences in anxiety and depression.

There are two main reasons for requesting support for a second wave. The most important of these is that unbiased and powerful tests of casual hypotheses which cannot be obtained in a cross- sectional survey can be obtained with panel data. The second reason for requesting support is that the new data collection would increase the breadth of the inquiry by adding measures of concepts that could not be included in the previous data collection. The most important of these are measures relevant to the analysis of the differentiation of predictors of episode recurrence from the predictors of episode onset. We can use this differentiation to adjust for the possibility that a history of prior disorder explains the stress-buffering effects of social support, personality characteristics, and coping styles. An explanation of these effects by a latent vulnerability factor representing personal dispositon to clinical disorder has been hypothetized, but not previously tested.
R01MH042714
KESSLER, RONALD C

Time
1987-06-01
1992-05-31
Funded by the NIH National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences through its Clinical and Translational Science Awards Program, grant number UL1TR002541.